Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, and public outreach events using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities.  Recordings of events in these areas are all available On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

  

 

Thursday May 12, 2016
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Spectral distortions of the CMB provide a powerful new probe of early Universe processes. Even if so far no average spectral distortion has been seen, LCDM does predict several signals that are within reach of current technology. In this talk, I will give a broad brush overview of our most recent understanding of the formation and evolution of distortions in the early Universe, highlighting guaranteed LCDM signals and what we hope to learn from them about the Universe we live in.

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Thursday May 12, 2016
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We have recently demonstrated an experimental platform to isolate 2D materials that are unstable in the ambient environment. I will discuss our recent studies of the charge density wave compound 1T-TaS2 and superconducting 2H-NbSe¬ in the atomically thin limit, made possible using this technique. In TaS2, we uncover a new surface charge density wave transition that is distinct from that in the bulk layers, as well as demonstrate continuous electrical control over this phase transition.

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Thursday May 12, 2016
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Beyond their deceptively featureless ground states, spin liquids are particularly remarkable in the exotic nature of their (fractionalised and gauge charged) excitations. Quenched disorder can be instrumental in nucleating or localising defects with unusual properties, revealing otherwise hidden features of these topological many-body states. This talk discusses how to turn the nuisance of disorder into a powerful probe and origin of new collective behaviour.

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Wednesday May 11, 2016
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We present results from a study of Euclidean dynamical triangulations in an attempt to make contact with Weinberg's asymptotic safety scenario. We find that a fine-tuning is necessary in order to recover semiclassical behavior, and that once this tuning is performed, our simulations provide evidence in support of the asymptotic safety scenario for gravity. We discuss our motivation for the tuning and present our numerical results.

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Wednesday May 11, 2016
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Recent developments in our understanding of black hole evaporation and the information paradox suggest that effects from quantum gravity are not necessarily hidden at the Planck scale. They might even one day be testable by gravitational wave measurements. To prepare ourselves, we must first understand what quantum gravity really means. Thankfully, we are pre-armed with a deep principle about gravity—that spacetime is really a hologram—and a powerful model for making this idea precise: gauge/gravity duality.

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Tuesday May 10, 2016
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As discussed in last week’s colloquium, the use of the p-adic metric in state space provides a route to resolving the Bell Theorem in favour of realism and local causality, without fine tuning. Here the p-adic integers provide a natural way to describe the fractal geometry of Invariant Set Theory’s state space. In this talk I first explore the role of complex numbers in Invariant Set Theory (arXiv:1605.01051), and describe a novel realistic perspective on quantum interferometry.

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Tuesday May 10, 2016
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We study the properties of operators in a unitary conformal field theory whose scaling dimensions approach each other for some values of the parameters and satisfy von Neumann-Wigner non-crossing rule. We argue that the scaling dimensions of such operators and their OPE coefficients have a universal scaling behavior in the vicinity of the crossing point. We demonstrate that the obtained relations are in a good agreement with the known examples of the level-crossing phenomenon in maximally supersymmetric N=4 Yang-Mills theory, three-dimensional conformal field theories and QCD.

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Tuesday May 10, 2016
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An unbroken U(1)' is a minimal possibility for a dark matter self interaction, and may even be associated with dark matter stability. However, such an interaction faces incredibly strong constraints due to collective plasma effects, which dominate over 2-to-2 scattering by an order-of-magnitude of orders-of-magnitude. I will discuss the physics of these collective effects, and show preliminary results of simulation. The constraint of such a self interaction is estimated to be nearly as weak as gravity.

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Tuesday May 10, 2016
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Gravitational lensing by matter clumps can magnify various transient bursts in the sky, making them more detectable from the high redshift Universe. For one example, chirping gravitational waves from stellar-mass black hole binary mergers, as first detected by LIGO recently, can appear louder due to intervening galaxies. In the absence of electromagnetic counterpart, as I will discuss, lensing magnification can bias the determination of binary mass and redshift, which needs to be corrected for when testing source evolution and formation models through event statistics.

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Monday May 09, 2016
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In the last few years, we have made remarkable progress in understanding the properties of our observable Universe which appears to have evolved from a hot Big Bang 13.7 billion years ago. The fine-tuning of initial conditions required to reproduce our present day Universe suggests that our Universe may merely be a region within an eternally inflating super-region. Many other regions could exist beyond our observable Universe with each such region governed by a different set of physical parameters than the ones we have measured for our Universe.

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