Perimeter Public Lectures

Perimeter Public Lectures

 

 

Wednesday Dec 02, 2020

In her December 2 Perimeter Public Lecture webcast, Hallberg will explore examples of emergent phenomena and demonstrate how we can tackle these problems using quantum information to filter the most relevant data. By advancing research in this field, we hope to seed advances with applications from medical equipment and new materials to efficient energy generation, transportation, and storage.

Collection/Series: 
 

 

Wednesday Nov 04, 2020

In her live Perimeter Public Lecture webcast on November 4, 2020, physicist Catherine Beauchemin used contemporary examples from COVID-19 and influenza to explain eroding public trust in health research – and why a dose of physics may be just the prescription we need. Beauchemin is a Professor of Physics at Ryerson University and a Deputy Program Director in the RIKEN Interdisciplinary Theoretical and Mathematical Sciences Program in Japan.

Collection/Series: 
 

 

Wednesday Oct 07, 2020

What do data science and the foundations of quantum theory have to do with one another?

A great deal, it turns out. The particular branch of data science known as causal inference focuses on a problem which is central to disciplines ranging from epidemiology to economics: that of disentangling correlation and causation in statistical data.

Collection/Series: 

 

Wednesday Oct 23, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Albert Einstein predicted a century ago the existence of gravitational waves – ripples in the fabric of spacetime moving at the speed of light. It was believed that these ripples were so faint that no experiment would ever be precise enough to detect them. But in September 2015, LIGO did exactly that. The teams working with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors in Louisiana and Washington measured a loud gravitational wave signal as it traveled through the Earth after a billion-year journey from the violent merger of two black holes.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

 

Wednesday Oct 02, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Advances in biotech, cyber-technology, robotics, and space exploration could, if applied wisely, allow a bright future – even for 10 billion people – by the end of this century.

But there are dystopian risks we ignore at our peril.

Collection/Series: 

 

Wednesday May 01, 2019

To make progress on serious problems in biology and medicine takes a combination of skills, tools, and approaches, often requiring collaboration across seemingly disparate fields. The trick to making breakthroughs often lies in learning to communicate across disciplines to identify existing technologies – and, crucially, the new tools that need to be invented.
 

Collection/Series: 

 

Wednesday Apr 17, 2019
Speaker(s): 
Quantum physics is the golden child of modern science. It is the basis of our understanding of atoms, radiation, and so much else - from elementary particles and basic forces to the behaviour of materials. But for a century it has also been the problem child of science: it has been plagued by intense disagreements among its inventors, strange paradoxes, and implications that seem like the stuff of fantasy.
Collection/Series: 
 

 

Wednesday Apr 03, 2019
Speaker(s): 

For thousands of years, astronomy was restricted to what we could see with our eyes. But visible light makes up only a tiny fraction of a spectrum emitted by celestial objects.

We now know that light is not the universe’s sole means to reveal the mysteries of the heavens. Until recently, we simply lacked the windows through which to view these aspects of our universe.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

 

Wednesday Mar 06, 2019

The 21st century may come to be known as the Age of Photonics, as we exploit our ability to make and manipulate light as an amazing carrier of energy and information. From quantum computing and entanglement to eye surgery and solar energy, humans are already reaping the benefits of our own endeavours to understand and control light.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

 

Wednesday Feb 06, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Clifford V. Johnson is a theoretical physicist passionate about sharing science with the public. He resolved to write a book explaining physics to a lay audience, but he felt that words on a printed page did not fully convey the dynamic, collaborative nature of fundamental research.

Collection/Series: 

Pages