Cosmology & Gravitation

This series consists of talks in the areas of Cosmology, Gravitation and Particle Physics.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

TBA
Oct 6 2020 - 2:30pm
Speaker(s):
Scientific Areas:
TBA
Oct 20 2020 - 11:00am
Speaker(s):
Scientific Areas:
Speaker(s):
Scientific Areas:
Nov 10 2020 - 11:00am
Speaker(s):
Scientific Areas:
TBA
Nov 17 2020 - 11:00am
Scientific Areas:
 

 

Tuesday Sep 22, 2020
Speaker(s): 

Understanding galaxy formation is an outstanding problem in Astrophysics. The feedback processes that drive it, exploding stars and accretion onto supermassive black holes, are poorly understood. This results in an order unity uncertainty in the distribution of the gas inside halos, the ``missing baryon problem''. Because baryons are 15% of the total mass in the universe, this baryonic uncertainty is the largest theoretical systematics for percent precision weak lensing surveys like DES, HSC, Rubin Observatory, Roman Observatory and Euclid.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Tuesday Sep 15, 2020
Speaker(s): 

Measurements of gravitational lensing in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) allow the dark matter distribution to be mapped out to uniquely high redshifts. After giving a brief overview of current and upcoming CMB lensing measurements, I will focus on two new ways of using CMB lensing, in combination with galaxy surveys, to constrain the early universe. First, I will explore how CMB lensing and galaxy surveys could provide insights into current discrepancies in measurements of the Hubble constant.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Tuesday Jul 28, 2020
Speaker(s): 

On Monday July 20th, we announced the final results from extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS), the last large-scale structure galaxy survey to be undertaken within the umbrella of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This marks the culmination of 20 years of galaxy surveys undertaken using the Sloan Foundation Telescope.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Tuesday Jul 14, 2020
Speaker(s): 

The standard cosmological model determined from the accurate cosmic microwave background measurements made by the Planck satellite implies a value of the Hubble constant H0 that is 4.2 standard deviations lower than the one determined from Type Ia supernovae. The Planck best fit model also predicts lower values of the matter density fraction Om and clustering amplitude S8 compared to those obtained from the Dark Energy Survey Year 1 data.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Tuesday Jul 07, 2020
Speaker(s): 

Zoom Link:  https://pitp.zoom.us/j/93581608531?pwd=d3NRQXRGNTNISkhuWmxLYkJMZllTUT09

Based on recent work arXiv:1902.08207 and arXiv:1911.02018 with E. Verlinde.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Tuesday Jun 30, 2020
Speaker(s): 

Over the last decade, the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure (EFTofLSS) has emerged as a frontrunner in the effort to produce accurate models of cosmological statistics. Quantities such as power spectra can be fit with sub-percent precision, and there is a wealth of literature applying the formalism to more complex statistics. It is interesting to ask what lies ahead for the theory. Can it be used for cosmological parameter inference? And is it just for statistics based on the 3D density field?

 

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Tuesday Jun 16, 2020
Speaker(s): 

COVID-19 is a mysterious disease associated with a large number of unanswered questions. 

In this talk we review what is currently known, what is still a mystery and highlight some of our recent work on the role of climate, blood type and vaccinations on the transmission of the disease and on the extent of "dark infections", the asymptomatic and untested proportion of infections. We end with a list of open research questions that may be amenable to techniques from physics and data science.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Tuesday May 19, 2020
Speaker(s): 

The discovery of the Higgs boson has revealed that the quartic Higgs self-coupling becomes small at very high energy scales. Guided by this observation, I introduce Higgs Parity, which is a spontaneously broken symmetry exchanging the standard model Higgs with its parity partner. In addition to explaining the small Higgs quartic coupling, Higgs Parity can provide a dark matter candidate, solve the strong CP problem, and arise from an SO(10) grand unified gauge symmetry.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

 

Thursday Feb 06, 2020
Speaker(s): 

Through their observable properties, the first and smallest dark matter halos represent a rare probe of subkiloparsec-scale variations in the density of the early Universe. These density variations could hold clues to the nature of inflation, the postinflationary cosmic history, and the identity of dark matter. However, the dynamical complexity of these microhalos hinders their usage as cosmological probes.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

 

Thursday Feb 06, 2020
Speaker(s): 

CMB lensing tomography has the potential to map the amplitude and growth of structure over cosmic time, provide some of the most stringent tests of gravity, and break important degeneracies between cosmological parameters. I use the unWISE photometric galaxy catalog to create three samples at median redshifts z~0.6, 1.1, and 1.5, and cross-correlate them with the most recent Planck CMB lensing maps.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

Pages