Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, and public outreach events using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities.  Recordings of events in these areas are all available On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

  

 

Tuesday Jan 17, 2006
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I review our recent work on confinement in 2+1 Yang Mills theory using Karabali-Nair variables. I'll discuss our successful prediction of the glueball spectrum, including the manifestations of the QCD string.

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Tuesday Jan 17, 2006
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The theory of cosmological perturbations provides a bridge between theoretical models of the early universe (often motivated by string theory) and astrophysical observation, e.g of the CMBR. Since extra dimensions are pivotal to string theory, the known lore of perturbation theory needs to be adjusted accordingly. After introducing the needed formalism, I will illustrate its use on an example within the framework of String Gas Cosmology

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Thursday Jan 12, 2006
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We calculate analytically the highly damped quasinormal mode spectra of generic single-horizon black holes using the rigorous WKB techniques of Andersson and Howls. We thereby provide a firm foundation for previous analysis, and point out some of their possible limitations. The numerical coefficient in the real part of the highly damped frequency is generically determined by the behavior of coupling of the perturbation to the gravitational field near the origin, as expressed in tortoise coordinates.

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Wednesday Jan 11, 2006
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We consider the problem of bounded-error quantum state identification: given one of two known states, what is the optimal probability with which we can identify the given state, subject to our guess being correct with high probability (but we are permitted to output "don't know" instead of a guess). We prove a direct product theorem for this problem. Our proof is based on semidefinite programming duality and the technique may be of wider interest. Using this result, we present two new exponential separations in the simultaneous message passing model of communication complexity.

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Wednesday Jan 04, 2006
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The scientific approach to consciousness is a relatively new pursuit, but it has already revealed some startling facts about the cavalcade of feelings, images and thoughts that stream through our heads every waking moment. Jay Ingram will present some of the most surprising of these in a talk based on his best-selling book, Theatre of the Mind. Jay Ingram is the author of several bestselling books, including The Science of Everyday Life, The Barmaid’s Brain and The Velocity of Honey.

 

Wednesday Dec 14, 2005
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A swashbuckling tale of greed, deception, and quantum data hiding on the high seas. When we hide or encrypt information, it's probably because that information is valuable. I present a novel approach to quantum data hiding based this assumption. An entangled treasure map marks the spot where a hoard of doubloons is buried, but the sailors sharing this map want all the treasure for themselves! How should they study their map using LOCC? This simple scenario yields a surprisingly rich and counterintuitive game theoretic structure.

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Tuesday Dec 13, 2005
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The phenomenology of quantum gravity can be examined even though the underlying theory is not yet fully understood. Effective extensions of the standard model allow us to study specific features, such as the existence of extra dimensions or a minimal length scale. I will talk about some applications of this approach which can be used to make predictions for particle- and astrophysics, and fill in some blanks in the puzzle of quantum gravity. A central point of this investigations is the physics of black holes.

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