Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, and public outreach events using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities.  Recordings of events in these areas are all available On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

  

 

Friday Aug 15, 2008
Speaker(s): 

Put two physicists in a room and ask them to talk about the interpretation of quantum mechanics. This is a recipe for disagreement; the mysteries of quantum theory run so deep that it’s hard to find any interpretive claims that are immune to controversy. Therefore, when thinking about quantum theory, it is a useful tactic to first focus on the macroscopic facts it predicts while ignoring the formalism and what it might suggest about the constitution of reality. I will adopt this tactic in my talk to describe the strange features of sequences of Stern-Gerlach measurements.

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Friday Aug 15, 2008
Speaker(s): 

Put two physicists in a room and ask them to talk about the interpretation of quantum mechanics. This is a recipe for disagreement; the mysteries of quantum theory run so deep that it’s hard to find any interpretive claims that are immune to controversy. Therefore, when thinking about quantum theory, it is a useful tactic to first focus on the macroscopic facts it predicts while ignoring the formalism and what it might suggest about the constitution of reality. I will adopt this tactic in my talk to describe the strange features of sequences of Stern-Gerlach measurements.

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Thursday Aug 14, 2008
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The speculation that Dark Energy can be explained by the backreaction of present inhomogeneities on the evolution of the background cosmology has been increasingly debated in the recent literature. We demonstrate quantitively that the backreaction of linear perturbations on the Friedmann equations is small but is nevertheless non-vanishing. This indicates the need for an improved averaging procedure capable of averaging tensor quantities in a generally covariant way.

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Wednesday Aug 13, 2008
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One of the quintessential features of quantum information is its exclusivity, the inability of strong quantum correlations to be shared by many physical systems. Likewise, complementarity has a similar status in quantum mechanics as the sine qua non of quantum phenomena. We show that this is no coincidence, and that the central role of exclusivity in quantum information theory stems from the phenomenon of complementarity.

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Wednesday Aug 13, 2008
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Wednesday Aug 13, 2008
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A discussion of how the zero point energy of atoms is what makes possible their existence in our universe – atoms are purely quantum mechanical objects.

Learning Outcomes:

• Continuation of QM-9: A calculus-based derivation of the zero point energy of the quantum harmonic oscillator.

• How our previous understanding of energy quantization and zero point energy can be applied also to the hydrogen atom.

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Wednesday Aug 13, 2008
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Understanding the zero point energy of the quantum harmonic oscillator as a consequence of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle.

Learning Outcomes:

• Understanding why the minimum energy of a ball in a bowl must be greater than zero based on the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle.

• How the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle adds a purely quantum mechanical kinetic energy to the ball, in addition to its classical potential energy.

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Wednesday Aug 13, 2008
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Wednesday Aug 13, 2008
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A discussion of the space and time axes of a moving observer and an introduction to length contraction.

Learning Outcomes:

• Understanding why and by how much a moving observer’s position axis is “tilted in time.”

• Understanding how a moving platform appears to a stationary observer.

• Beginning to understand the cause of length contraction.

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Wednesday Aug 13, 2008
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A continuation of the SR-10 discussion on length contraction. Resolving Principle 2*.
Learning Outcomes:
• Relativity of simultaneity revisited – gaining a deeper understanding of what it means.
• A full understanding of the nature of length contraction based on relativity of simultaneity.
• Resolving a key paradox in special relativity: Principle 2*, introduced in SR-4. How it is possible to measure the same speed for the light whether you are running toward or away from a flashlight.

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