Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, and public outreach events using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities.  Recordings of events in these areas are all available On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

  

 

Monday May 12, 2014

A self-correcting quantum memory is a physical system whose quantum state can be preserved over a long period of time without the need for any external intervention. The most promising candidates are topological quantum systems which would protect information encoded in their degenerate groundspace while interacting with a thermal environment. Many models have been suggested but several approaches have been shown to fail due to no-go results of increasingly general scope.

 

Monday May 12, 2014
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Complex quantum systems out of equilibrium are at the basis of a number of long-standing questions in physics. This talk will be concerned on the one hand with recent progress on understanding how quantum many-body systems out of equilibrium eventually come to rest, thermalise and cross phase transitions, on the other hand with dynamical analogue quantum simulations using cold atoms [1-4]. In an outlook, we will discuss the question of certification of quantum simulators, and will how this problem also arises in other related settings, such as in Boson samplers [5,6]. [1] S.

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Monday May 12, 2014
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Studies of the quantum dynamics of isolated systems are currently providing fundamental insights into how statistical mechanics emerges under unitary time evolution. Thermalization seems ubiquitous, but experiments with ultracold gases have shown that it need not always occur, particularly near an integrable point. Unfortunately, computational studies of generic (nonintegrable) models are limited to small systems, for which arbitrarily long times can be calculated, or short times, for which large or infinite system sizes can be solved.

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Monday May 12, 2014

 

Friday May 09, 2014
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After the seminal work of Connes and Tretkoff on the Gauss-Bonnet theorem for the noncommutative 2-torus and its extension by Fathizadeh and myself, there have been significant developments in understanding the local differential geometry of these noncommutative spaces equipped with curved metrics. In this talk, I will review a series of joint works with Farzad Fathizadeh in which we compute the scalar curvature for curved noncommutative tori and prove the analogue of Weyl's law and Connes' trace theorem.

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Friday May 09, 2014
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The same bulk two-dimensional topological phase can have multiple distinct, fully-chiral edge phases. We show that this can occur in the integer quantum Hall states at fillings 8 and 12 with experimentally-testable consequences. We also show examples for Abelian fractional quantum Hall states, the simplest examples being at filling fractions 8/7, 12/11, 8/15, 16/5. For all examples, we propose experiments that can distinguish distinct edge phases. Our results are summarized by the observation that edge phases correspond to lattices while bulk phases correspond to genera of lattices.

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Thursday May 08, 2014
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We study the classical constraint algebra of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity, where due to the breaking of 4d diffeomorphism symmetry, there is a new dimensionless coupling absent in GR and whose role is not yet clear. Starting from two apparently contradictory results, we show how the role of the extra coupling differs between the projectable and non-projectable versions of the theory. In particular, we see how in the latter, it gives rise to a non-trivial constraint algebra, akin to the conditions seen in the CMC gauge of GR.

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Thursday May 08, 2014
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Our current definition of what a black hole is relies heavily on the assumption that there exists a finite maximum speed of propagation for any signal. Indeed, one is tempted to think that the notion of a black hole has no place in a world with infinitely fast signal propagation. I will use concrete examples from Lorentz-violating gravity theories to demonstrate that this naive expectation is not necessarily true.

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