Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, public outreach events such as talks from top scientists using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities. 

Recordings of events in these areas are all available and On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

Accessibly by anyone with internet, Perimeter aims to share the power and wonder of science with this free library.

 

  

 

 

 

Tuesday Oct 22, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Many free-fermion topological phases can be diagnosed by analyzing a suitable collection of symmetry data. While the Fu-Kane parity criterion for topological insulators is an early example, the systematic generalization to cover all possible crystalline symmetries and their associated topological phases has only recently been achieved.

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Tuesday Oct 22, 2019
Speaker(s): 

The AdS/CFT correspondence provides a remarkably useful tool
for asking questions in quantum gravity, as it formulates a theory of
quantum gravity in terms of an ordinary non-gravitational quantum field
theory.  Fruitfully exploiting this correspondence therefore requires
understanding how to translate the language of CFT into gravity; a key
insight that has emerged over the past decade is that the entanglement
structure of the CFT must be intimately tied to the emergence of the

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Tuesday Oct 22, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Making use of modern multi-core computers (and multi-machine supercomputers) in Python can be achieved in a few different ways.  I will present the built-in Python “multiprocessing” module approach, which tends to work well and relatively painlessly for “naturally parallel” (aka “embarrassingly parallel”) problems. I’ll show what is required to use this approach, including how to submit jobs to the Slurm batch system on Symmetry.

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