Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, public outreach events such as talks from top scientists using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities. 

Recordings of events in these areas are all available and On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

Accessibly by anyone with internet, Perimeter aims to share the power and wonder of science with this free library.

 

  

 

Wednesday Oct 30, 2019
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 Holographic quantum error correcting codes (HQECC) have been proposed as toy models for the AdS/CFT correspondence, and exhibit many of the features of the duality. HQECC give a mapping of states and observables. However, they do not map local bulk Hamiltonians to local Hamiltonians on the boundary. In this work, we combine HQECC with Hamiltonian simulation theory to construct a bulk-boundary mapping between local Hamiltonians, whilst retaining all the features of the HQECC duality.

 

Wednesday Oct 30, 2019
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We will talk about recent progress in NMR technologies simulating topological phases. We will describe how states are prepared, how they are evolved in time and various tricks that we can play with it, including measurements of topological properties such as modular matrices, and thus potentially applied for identifying phases of matter in future simulations.

 

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Tuesday Oct 29, 2019
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Tuesday Oct 29, 2019

Behind certain marginally trapped surfaces one can construct a geometry containing an extremal surface of equal, but not larger area. This construction underlies the Engelhardt-Wall proposal for explaining the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy as a coarse-grained entropy. The construction can be proven to exist classically but fails if the Null Energy Condition is violated. Here we extend the coarse-graining construction to semiclassical gravity. Its validity is conjectural, but we are able to extract an interesting nongravitational limit.

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Tuesday Oct 29, 2019
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Machine learning has led to recent advancements in image processing, language translation, finance, robotics, musical and visual arts, and medical diagnosis. In this session, we will explore how machine learning can be applied within fields of physics. We will introduce fundamental concepts in machine learning such a neural networks and supervised vs. unsupervised learning, and then proceed to learn to use tools from Python's TensorFlow library.

 

 

Tuesday Oct 29, 2019
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Ghostly neutrino particles continue to bring surprises to fundamental physics, from their existence to the phenomenon of neutrino oscillation which implies that their masses are nonzero. Their exact masses, among the most curious unknowns beyond the Standard Model of particle physics, can soon be probed by the joint analysis of upcoming cosmological surveys including LSST, Euclid, WFIRST, Simons Observatory, and CMB-S4. In this talk, I will first discuss ongoing work studying the effects of massive neutrinos.

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Monday Oct 28, 2019
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We give a quantum speedup for solving the canonical semidefinite programming relaxation for binary quadratic optimization. The class of relaxations for combinatorial optimization has so far eluded quantum speedups. Our methods combine ideas from quantum Gibbs sampling and matrix exponent updates. A de-quantization of the algorithm also leads to a faster classical solver. For generic instances, our quantum solver gives a nearly quadratic speedup over state-of-the-art algorithms.
This is joint work with Fernando Brandao (Caltech) and Daniel Stilck Franca (QMATH, Copenhagen).

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