Strong Gravity

This series consists of talks in areas where gravity is the main driver behind interesting or peculiar phenomena, from astrophysics to gravity in higher dimensions.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

Currently there are no upcoming talks in this series.

 

Friday Dec 04, 2009
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One of the main science objectives for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is to quantitatively map the strong field regions around compact objects using Extreme-Mass-Ratio Inspirals (EMRIs). This idea has been shown to be possible in principle, however in practice only inspirals in a Kerr spacetime have been studied in detail. A spacetime mapping algorithm for an EMRI inspiral into a generic compact object is formulated using ideas from integrable systems. I discuss several aspects of the theoretical development required to make the problem tractable.

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Thursday Nov 05, 2009

I present an overview of how inspiral-merger-ringdown (IMR) waveforms are currently being used within LIGO and Virgo search efforts. I'll discuss search strategies from the two major astrophysics working groups within t he LIGO/Virgo collaboration searching for transient gravitational-wave signals - the Compact Binary Coalescence group and the Burst Group.

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Thursday Oct 08, 2009
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With the imminent detection of gravitational waves by ground-based interferometers, such as LIGO, VIRGO and TAMA, pulsar timing observations, and proposed space-borne detectors, such as LISA, we must ask ourselves: how much do we trust general relativity? The confirmation of general relativity through Solar System experiments and binary pulsar observations has proved its validity in the weak-field, where velocities are small and gravity is weak, but no such tests exist in the strong, dynamical regime, precisely the regime of most interest to gravitational wave observations.

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Thursday Sep 24, 2009
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The uncertainty in the equation of state of cold matter above nuclear density is notorious. Despite four decades of neutron-star observations, recent observational estimates of neutron-star radii still range from 8 to 16 km; the pressure above nuclear density is not known to better than a factor of 5; and one cannot yet rule out the possibility that the ground state of cold matter at zero pressure might be strange quark matter -- that the term "neutron star" is a misnomer for strange quark stars.

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