Particle Physics

This series consists of talks in the areas of Particle Physics, High Energy Physics & Quantum Field Theory.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

 

 

Tuesday Jun 23, 2020
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Neutrinos are a key (although implicit) ingredient of the standard cosmological model, LambdaCDM. Firstly, neutrinos directly participate in neutron freeze out during BBN, and secondly, they represent 40% of the energy density of the Universe after electron positron annihilation up to almost matter radiation equality. The latter fact makes neutrinos a necessary element to understand CMB observations. 

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Tuesday Jun 16, 2020
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Tuesday Jun 09, 2020
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The inference of the present expansion rate from the Cosmic Microwave Background and other early-time probes (assuming standard

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Tuesday Apr 28, 2020
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Light dark photons are subject to various plasma effects, such as Debye screening and resonant oscillations, which can lead to a more complex cosmological evolution than is experienced by conventional cold dark matter candidates. Maintaining a consistent history of dark photon dark matter requires ensuring that the super-thermal abundance present in the early Universe (i) does not deviate significantly after the formation of the CMB, and (ii) does not excessively leak into the Standard Model plasma after BBN.

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Tuesday Apr 21, 2020
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In this talk I will discuss ongoing efforts at UChicago to explore matter made of light. I will begin with a broad introduction to the challenges associated with making matter from photons, focusing specifically on (1) how to trap photons and imbue them with synthetic mass and charge; (2) how to induce photons to collide with one another; and (3) how to drive photons to order, by cooling or otherwise.

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Wednesday Mar 25, 2020
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Historically, new particles and forces in the Standard Model have most often revealed themselves at high-energy particle colliders. Certain phenomena beyond the Standard Model, however, are best studied by using carefully designed low-energy precision measurements, or via their imprints on astrophysical and cosmological observables. In this talk, I will provide a concise overview of some of the new experiments and searches devised to look for new physics beyond the Standard Model.

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Tuesday Mar 10, 2020
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Theories beyond the Standard Model of particle physics often predict new, light, feebly interacting particles whose discovery requires novel search strategies. A light particle, the QCD axion, elegantly solves the outstanding strong-CP problem of the Standard Model; cousins of the QCD axion can also appear, and are natural dark matter candidates.  First, I will discuss my experimental proposal based on thin films, in which dark matter can efficiently convert to detectable single photons.

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Tuesday Jan 21, 2020
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I will consider simple scalar gauge theories with one scalar field in a low-dimensional representation of a gauge group. The renormalizable action often has accidental symmetries that lead to one or more stable states, providing Dark Matter candidates. The gauge group can confine, or be spontaneously broken by the scalar field: I will discuss the spectrum and symmetries in both cases, focusing in particular on possible dualities between the Higgs and confined phases.

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Tuesday Dec 10, 2019
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Substantial astronomical observations have established that approximately 25% of the energy density of the universe is composed of cold non-baryonic dark matter, whose detection and characterization could be key to improving our understanding of the laws of physics. Over the past three decades, physicists have largely focused on searching for dark matter within the 10 GeV-1 TeV range (WIMPs), unfortunately without success.In this talk, we’ll discuss the experimental requirements when searching for dark matter throughout the mass range from 50meV- 500 MeV.

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