Machine Learning Initiative

The adoption of machine learning (ML) into theoretical physics comes on the heels of an explosion of industry progress that started in 2012. Since that time, computer scientists have demonstrated that learning algorithms - those designed to respond and adapt to new data - provide an exceptionally powerful platform for tackling many difficult tasks in image recognition, natural language comprehension, game play and more. This new breed of ML algorithm has now conquered benchmarks previously thought to be decades away due to their high mathematical complexity. In the last several years, researchers at Perimeter have begun to examine machine learning algorithms for application to a new set of problems, including condensed matter, quantum information, numerical relativity, quantum gravity and astrophysics.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

Currently there are no upcoming talks in this series.
 

 

Friday Oct 26, 2018
Speaker(s): 

We implement projective quantum Monte Carlo (PQMC) methods to simulate quantum annealing on classical computers. We show that in the regime where the systematic errors are well controlled, PQMC algorithms are capable of simulating the imaginary-time dynamics of the Schroedinger equation both on continuous space models and discrete basis systems. We also demonstrate that the tunneling time of the PQMC method is quadratically faster than the one of incoherent quantum annealing.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Friday Aug 24, 2018
Speaker(s): 

We propose to generalise classical maximum likelihood learning to density matrices. As the objective function, we propose a quantum likelihood that is related to the cross entropy between density matrices. We apply this learning criterion to the quantum Boltzmann machine (QBM), previously proposed by Amin et al. We demonstrate for the first time learning a quantum Hamiltonian from quantum statistics using this approach. For the anti-ferromagnetic Heisenberg and XYZ model we recover the true ground state wave function and Hamiltonian.

Collection/Series: 
 

 

Tuesday Aug 07, 2018
Speaker(s): 

Short-depth algorithms are crucial for reducing computational error on near-term quantum computers, for which decoherence and gate infidelity remain important issues. Here we present a machine-learning inspired approach for discovering such algorithms. We apply our method to a ubiquitous primitive: computing the overlap Tr(rho*sigma) between two quantum states rho and sigma. The standard algorithm for this task, known as the Swap Test, is used in many applications such as quantum support vector machines, and, when specialized to rho=sigma, quantifies the Renyi entanglement.

Collection/Series: