Colloquium

This series covers all areas of research at Perimeter Institute, as well as those outside of PI's scope.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

Feb 21 2018 - 2:00pm
Room #: 294
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Feb 22 2018 - 11:00am
Room #: 405
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TBA
Mar 14 2018 - 2:00pm
Room #: 294
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TBA
Apr 25 2018 - 2:00pm
Room #: 294
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Thursday Feb 15, 2018
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The recent detection of the binary neutron star merger GW170817 by LIGO and Virgo was followed by a firework of electromagnetic counterparts across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. In particular, the ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared emission is consistent with a kilonova that provided strong evidence for the formation of heavy elements in the merger ejecta by the rapid neutron capture process (r-process).

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Wednesday Feb 14, 2018
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Hidden-variables theories account for quantum mechanics in terms of a particular 'equilibrium' distribution of underlying parameters corresponding to the Born rule. In the most well-studied example, the pilot-wave theory of de Broglie and Bohm, it is well established that the Born rule may be understood to arise from a process of dynamical relaxation. This 'quantum relaxation' may have taken place in the very early universe and could have left imprints on the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Such imprints amount to signatures of the decay of early violations of the Born rule.

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Wednesday Feb 07, 2018
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One of the most enduring mysteries in particle physics is the nature of the non-baryonic dark matter that makes up 85% of the matter in the universe. For several decades, most searches for this mysterious substance have focused on Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Recently, there has been a surge in theoretical interest in ultra-light-field dark matter candidates, including QCD axions (spin 0 bosons) and hidden photons (spin 1 bosons), which can be probed through their coupling to electromagnetism or nuclear spin.

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Wednesday Jan 17, 2018
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I will discuss the `holographic complexity conjecture', that seeks to relate the size of the wormhole that lies behind a black hole horizon to quantum computational complexity.

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Tuesday Dec 19, 2017
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In his classic essay, “The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge,” Abraham Flexner, the founding director of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and the man who helped bring Albert Einstein to the United States, describes a great paradox of scientific research. The search for answers to deep questions, motivated solely by curiosity and without concern for applications, often leads not only to the greatest scientific discoveries but also the most revolutionary technological breakthroughs. In short, no quantum mechanics, no computer chips.

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Thursday Nov 30, 2017

The observations of gravitational waves from the mergers of compact binary sources opens a new way to learn about the universe as well as to test General Relativity in the limit of strong gravitational interactions – the dynamics of massive bodies traveling at relativistic speeds in a highly curved space-time. The lecture will describe some of the difficult history of gravitational waves proposed about 100 years ago.

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Wednesday Nov 22, 2017
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Our sense of smell is extraordinarily good at molecular recognition: we can identify tens of thousands of odorants unerringly over a wide concentration range. The mechanism by which this happens is still hotly debated. One view is that molecular shape governs smell, but this notion has turned out to have very little predictive power. Some years ago I revived a discredited theory that posits instead that the nose is a vibrational spectroscope, and proposed a possible underlying mechanism, inelastic electron tunneling.

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Wednesday Nov 15, 2017
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In general relativity causal relations between any pair of events is uniquely determined by locally predefined variables - the distribution of matter-energy degrees of freedom in the events' past light-cone. Under the assumption of locally predefined causal order, agents performing freely chosen local operations on an initially local quantum state cannot violate Bell inequalities. However, superposition of massive objects can effectively lead to "entanglement" in the temporal order between groups of local operations, enabling the violation of the inequalities.

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Monday Nov 06, 2017
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The much-anticipated joint detection of gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation was achieved for the first time on August 17, 2017, for the binary neutron star merger GW170817.  This event was detected by Advanced LIGO/Virgo, gamma-ray satellites, and dozens of telescopes on the ground and in space spanning from radio to X-rays.  In this talk I will describe the exciting discovery of the optical counterpart, which in turn led to several detailed studies across the electromagnetic spectrum.  The results of the observations carried out by our team include the first detailed study o

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Wednesday Nov 01, 2017

The Cosmic Web is the fundamental spatial organization of matter in the Universe on scales of a few up to a hundred Megaparsec, scales at which the Universe still resides in a state of moderate dynamical evolution. Galaxies, intergalactic gas and dark matter exist in a wispy weblike spatial arrangement consisting of dense compact clusters, elongated filaments, and sheetlike walls, amidst large near-empty void regions.

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