Colloquium

This series covers all areas of research at Perimeter Institute, as well as those outside of PI's scope.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

Currently there are no upcoming talks in this series.

 

Wednesday Feb 28, 2007
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tba

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Wednesday Feb 21, 2007
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Neural circuits exhibit complex patterns of spontaneous activity. I will discuss how neural network models can reproduce this activity and how it interacts with responses evoked by sensory stimuli. This work involves analytic, mean-field and computer analyses of large systems of nonlinear differential equations with random parameters.

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Wednesday Feb 14, 2007
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Experimentalists at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider create exploding droplets of quark-gluon plasma, the stuff which filled the universe for the first microseconds after the big bang. I'll give one theorist's perspective on what we are learning about the properties of quark-gluon plasma from these experiments, including the conclusion that it is closer to an ideal liquid than to an ideal gas and the observation that it "quenches" high energy quarks ("jets") trying to plow through it.

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Wednesday Feb 07, 2007
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Soon after Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) was shown to exhibit asymptotic freedom at short distances, it was realized that it might be possible to create a new form of matter at high temperatures (T „d 150 MeV) in which hadrons dissolve and quarks and gluons become locally deconfined. Experiments have been carried out for the last two decades attempting to create this new form of matter, called ¡§quark-gluon plasma¡¨ (QGP), via high-energy collisions of large nuclei.

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Wednesday Jan 31, 2007
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With a cosmic flight simulator, we'll take a scenic journey through space and time. After exploring
our local Galactic neighborhood, we'll travel back 13.7 billion years to explore the Big Bang itself and
how state-of-the-art measurements are transforming our understanding of our cosmic origin and ultimate fate.
We then turn to the question of whether this can all be described purely mathematically, and discuss
implications ranging from standard physics topics like symmetries, irreducible representations, units,

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Wednesday Jan 24, 2007
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Understanding magnetic reconnection is one of the major challenges of plasma physics. It plays an essential role in a wide range of physical systems such as stellar flares, accretion disks, active galactic nuclei, astrophysical dynamos and closer to home, intense magnetic energy releases in the Earth's magnetosphere. It is a phenomena which can be created in the laboratory.

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Wednesday Jan 17, 2007
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If spacetime is "quantized" (discrete), then any equation of motion compatible with the Lorentz transformations is necessarily non-local. I will present evidence that this sort of nonlocality survives on length scales much greater than Planckian, yielding for example a nonlocal effective wave-equation for a scalar field propagating on an underlying causal set. Nonlocality of our effective field theories may thus provide a characteristic signature of quantum gravity.

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Wednesday Jan 10, 2007
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A full analysis of QCD, the fundamental theory of subnuclear structure and interactions, relies upon numerical simulations and the lattice approximation. After being stalled for almost 30 years, recent breakthroughs in lattice QCD allow us for the first time to analyze the low-energy structure of QCD nonperturbatively with few-percent precision. This talk will present a non-technical overview of the history leading up to these breakthroughs, and survey the wide array of applications that have been enabled by them.

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Wednesday Nov 29, 2006
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A nonrotating black hole placed in a tidal environment (that is, subjected to the gravitational interactions produced by other nearby bodies) is not described by the Schwarzschild solution to the Einstein field equations. Instead, its metric is given by a perturbed version of this exact solution, and the spacetime is no longer stationary nor spherically symmetric. After reviewing the situation in Newtonian theory, I shall describe how the metric of a tidally distorted black hole is calculated.

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