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Vidéotheque

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, public outreach events such as talks from top scientists using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities. 

Recordings of events in these areas are all available and On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

Accessibly by anyone with internet, Perimeter aims to share the power and wonder of science with this free library.

 

  

 

 

Mardi oct 08, 2019
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The discrete time-translation symmetry of a periodically-driven (Floquet) system allows for the existence of novel, nonequilibrium interacting phases of matter. A well-known example is the discrete time crystal, a phase characterized by the spontaneous breaking of this time-translation symmetry.

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Mardi oct 08, 2019
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I will describe an example in which ER=EPR can be understood as a worldsheet string duality, by finding the Lorentzian continuation of the FZZ duality. The result is that string perturbation theory around the thermofield double state in a disconnected spacetime with a condensate of entangled folded strings is equivalent to string theory in a connected two sided black hole spacetime. Important ingredients are the Lorentzian interpretation of time winding vertex operators, and string theory with target space Schwinger-Keldysh contours.

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Mardi oct 08, 2019
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The core Python language is not particularly powerful or fast for numerical computing.  Fortunately, there is a large "numerical python" library, "numpy", that is a standard part of any Python-using scientist's toolkit.  I will present numpy, the associated "scientific python" library, "scipy", and the popular "matplotlib" plotting library.

 

Vendredi oct 04, 2019
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