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Quantum Information

This series consists of talks in the area of Quantum Information Theory.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

Currently there are no upcoming talks in this series.

 

Jeudi mai 13, 2010
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In this talk (based on arXiv:1001.0354) we give a quantum statistical interpretation for the Kauffmann bracket polynomial state sum <K> for the Jones polynomial. We use this quantum mechanical interpretation to give a new quantum algorithm for computing the Jones polynomial. This algorithm is useful for its conceptual simplicity, and it applies to all values of the polynomial variable that lie on the unit circle in the complex plane.

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Lundi mar 29, 2010
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Multipartite quantum states constitute a (if not the) key resource for quantum computations and protocols. However obtaining a generic, structural understanding of entanglement in N-qubit systems is still largely an open problem. Here we show that multipartite quantum entanglement admits a compositional structure. The two SLOCC-classes of genuinely entangled 3-qubit states, the GHZ-class and the W-class, exactly correspond with the two kinds of commutative Frobenius algebras on C^2, namely `special' ones and `anti-special' ones.

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Lundi mar 22, 2010
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The original motivation to build a quantum computer came from Feynman who envisaged a machine capable of simulating generic quantum mechanical systems, a task that is intractable for classical computers. Such a machine would have tremendous applications in all physical sciences, including condensed matter physics, chemistry, and high energy physics. Part of Feynman's challenge was met by Lloyd who showed how to approximately decompose the time-evolution operator of interacting quantum particles into a short sequence of elementary gates, suitable for operation on a quantum computer.

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Lundi fév 08, 2010
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In quantum information, entanglement has often been viewed as a resource. But in this talk, I will look at (pure bipartite) entanglement through the lens of superselection rules. The idea is that it requires quantum communication not only to create entanglement, but also to destroy it in a way that doesn't leak information to the environment. As a result, when communication is scarce, superpositions of different numbers of EPR pairs can be difficult to obtain.

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Lundi jan 25, 2010
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I'll discuss some work-in-progress about the computational complexity of simulating the extremely "simple" quantum systems that arise in linear optics experiments. I'll show that *either* one can describe an experiment, vastly easier than building a universal quantum computer, that would test whether Nature is performing nontrivial quantum computation, or else one can give surprising new algorithms for approximating the permanent. Audience feedback as to which of these possibilities is the right one is sought. Joint work with Alex Arkhipov.

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Lundi déc 14, 2009
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Alongside the effort underway to build quantum computers, it is important to better understand which classes of problems they will find easy and which others even they will find intractable. Inspired by the success of the statistical study of classical constraint optimization problems, we study random ensembles of the QMA$_1$-complete quantum satisfiability (QSAT) problem introduced by Bravyi. QSAT appropriately generalizes the NP-complete classical satisfiability (SAT) problem.

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Lundi déc 07, 2009
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If a pure quantum state is drawn at random, this state will almost surely be almost maximally entangled. This is a well-known example for the "concentration of measure" phenomenon, which has proved to be tremendously helpful in recent years in quantum information theory. It was also used as a new method to justify some foundational aspects of statistical mechanics.

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Lundi mai 04, 2009
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Solving linear systems of equations is a common problem that arises both on its own and as a subroutine in more complex problems: given a matrix A and a vector b, find a vector x such that Ax=b. Often, one does not need to know the solution x itself, but rather an approximation of the expectation value of some operator associated with x, e.g., x'Mx for some matrix M. In this case, when A is sparse and well-conditioned, with largest dimension N, the best known classical algorithms can find x and estimate x'Mx in O(N * poly(log(N))) time.

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Lundi jan 19, 2009
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In topological quantum computation, a quantum algorithm is performed by braiding and fusion of certain quasi-particles called anyons. Therein, the performed quantum circuit is encoded in the topology of the braid. Thus, small inaccuracies in the world-lines of the braided anyons do not adversely affect the computation. For this reason, topological quantum computation has often been regarded as error-resilient per se, with no need for quantum error-correction. However, newer work [1], [2] shows that even topological computation is plagued with (small) errors.

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Lundi oct 20, 2008
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In the closed system setting I will show how to obtain extremely accurate adiabatic QC by proper choice of the interpolation between the initial and final Hamiltonians. Namely, given an analytic interpolation whose first N initial and final time derivatives vanish, the error can be made to be smaller than 1/N^N, with an evolution time which scales as N and the square of the norm of the time-derivative of the Hamiltonian, divided by the cube of the gap (joint work with Ali Rezakhani and Alioscia Hamma).

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