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Cosmology & Gravitation

This series consists of talks in the areas of Cosmology, Gravitation and Particle Physics.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

Currently there are no upcoming talks in this series.
 

 

Mardi jan 19, 2021
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The primordial non-Gaussianity (PNG) is a key feature to screen various inflationary models and it is one of the main targets in the next generation galaxy surveys. In particular, the local-type of PNG makes the galaxy bias scale-dependent in large-scales, which is known as the scale-dependent bias, allowing to constrain the local-type PNG from galaxy surveys. In this talk, I will present the galaxy shape correlation, called the ``intrinsic alignment'', can explore the angular-dependent PNG.

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Mardi jan 12, 2021
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The discovery of astrophysical gravitational waves has opened a new avenue to explore the cosmos using transients. I will discuss a few new frontiers in the field of physical cosmology and fundamental physics that can be explored using gravitational waves from the current generation gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO/Virgo, and in the future from gravitational wave detectors such as LISA, Einstein Telescope, and Cosmic Explorer.

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Mardi déc 15, 2020
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Tensions between measurements in the early and the late universe could be the first hint of new physics beyond the cosmological standard model. In particular, the clustering of large scale structure and the current value of the Hubble parameter show intriguing discrepancies between measurements in the early and late universe. In this talk, I review the most common ways of easing these two tensions and focus specifically on parameter extensions and various models of dark matter, such as warm dark matter, cannibalistic dark matter, dark matter interactions, and dark radiation.

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Mardi déc 08, 2020
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The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a photometric galaxy survey which, using measurements of distortions to galaxy shapes from weak gravitational lensing and other observables, we can use to test the validity of our standard cosmological model, LambdaCDM. As an example of this, I will motivate and discuss a recent analysis of the DES Year 1 data (described in https://arxiv.org/abs/2010.05924) in which we use a "growth-geometry split" parameterization to check the consistency of constraints from structure growth and expansion history.

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Mardi déc 08, 2020
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Torsion is a popular ingredient in gravity, yet fraught with quantum and classical pathologies. I develop a novel torsion theory, consistent with power-counting and unitarity. The Friedmann equations emerge (with dark energy and radiation), as do pp waves and the Schwarzschild vacuum, all without an Einstein-Hilbert term. I show that cosmology sees torsion as a non-canonical scalar, revealing a rich phenomenology of conformal or waterfall inflatons, and cuscutons. I finally argue that future work will be driven less by toy-models, and more by computer surveys.

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Mardi nov 24, 2020
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In the first part of the talk I will review some recent progress in large-scale structure theory and show how it can be used to measure cosmological parameters from current and future redshift surveys. Then I will discuss some ongoing challenges in the modeling of galaxy clsutering data and covariance matrices. Finally, I will present a systematic calculation of the probability distribution function for the dark matter density field and discuss its potential as a cosmological probe.

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Mardi nov 17, 2020

Gravitational waves (GWs) have already proved immensely powerful for constraining cosmological extensions of GR, both from data-driven and theoretical perspectives. However, GWs really come into their own when used in combination with complementary electromagnetic data. I’ll start by reviewing some of the bounds on extended gravity theories from GW detections to date. I'll introduce the formalism, the phenomenology, and the astrophysical pitfalls of these tests.

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Mardi nov 10, 2020
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In order to infer cosmological parameters from galaxy survey data, we typically use summary statistics such as the power spectrum and we need an accurate estimate of their covariance matrix. The traditional process of obtaining the covariance involves simulating thousands of mocks. I will present an analytic approach for the covariance matrix which is more than four orders of magnitude faster than mocks and show its validation with an analysis of the BOSS DR12 data. Furthermore, our analytic approach is free of sampling noise which makes it useful for upcoming surveys like DESI and Euclid.

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Mardi nov 03, 2020
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The standard model of cosmology is built upon on a series of propositions on how the early, intermediate, and late epochs of the Universe behave. In particular, it predicts that dark energy and dark matter currently pervades the cosmos. Understanding the properties of the dark sector is plausibly the biggest challenge in theoretical physics. There is, however, a broad assumption in cosmology that the Universe on its earlier stages is fully understood and that discrepancies between the standard model of cosmology and current data are suggestive of distinct dark energy properties.

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Mardi oct 27, 2020
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The new gravitational-wave signal GW190521in LIGO and Virgo marks the first observational detection of the elusive intermediate-mass black holes. The detection also confirms there exist a new class of black holes in the mass gap predicted by the pair-instability supernovae theory. In this talk, I will discuss the process that went behind inferring the astrophysical properties of this historic discovery. I would briefly address the alternative scenarios we looked into for a possible exotic origin of this signal, including any violation of General Relativity.

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