Quantum Many-Body Dynamics

Conference Date: 
Monday, May 12, 2014 (All day) to Friday, May 16, 2014 (All day)
Scientific Areas: 
Condensed Matter
Particle Physics
Quantum Information

Scientific Areas: 

Condensed Matter
Quantum Information
High Energy Physics

 

In recent years, much progress was achieved in realizing highly controlled and coherent many-body systems. Examples of such systems include systems of ultra-cold atoms, molecules, systems of NV-centers in diamond, and superconductiong quibits. These remarkable experimentally advances pose a conceptually new set of theoretical questions regarding the universal laws describing the evolution and relaxation of closed many-body systems. This workshop will cover the most exciting recent theoretical developments in non-equilibrium many-body physics. Focus topics include thermalization in integrable and non-integrable strongly interacting systems, thermalization breakdown, perodically driven systems, and many-body localization in systems with quenched disorder. We will discuss key changes in the field and identify the possible roles to their solution. 

To register for this event, click here.

Ehud Altman, Weizmann Institute of Science
Jean-Sebastian Caux, University of Amsterdam
Luca D'Alessio, Boston University
Eugene Demler, Harvard University
Jens Eisert, Freie University Berlin
Fabian Essler, University of Oxford
Matthew Fisher, University of California, Santa Barbara
John Imbrie, University of Virginia
Robert Konik, Brookhaven National Laboratory
Aditi Mitra, New York University
Arijeet Pal, Harvard University
Anatoli Polkovnikov, Boston University
Marcos Rigol, Pennsylvania State University
Lea Santos, Yeshiva University
Alessandro Silva, University of Trieste
Ronen Vosk, Weizmann Institute of Science

 

  • Dmitry Abanin, Perimeter Institute
  • Ehud Altman, Weizmann Institute of Science
  • Oleg Boulanov, Laval University
  • Jean-Sebastian Caux, University of Amsterdam
  • Juan Carrasquilla, Perimeter Institute
  • Anushya Chandran, Perimeter Institute
  • Eugene Demler, Harvard University
  • Jens Eisert, Freie University Berlin
  • Fabian Essler, University of Oxford
  • Matthew Fisher, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Yimin Ge, Perimeter Institute
  • John Imbrie, University of Virginia
  • Isaac Kim, Perimeter Institute
  • Robert Konik, Brookhaven National Laboratory
  • Oliver Landon-Cardinal, California Institute of Technology
  • Ipsita Mandal, Perimeter Institute
  • Aditi Mitra, New York University
  • Khadijeh Najafi, Georgetown University
  • Arijeet Pal, Harvard University
  • Zlatko Papic, Perimeter Institute
  • Anatoli Polkovnikov, Boston University
  • Marcos Rigol, Pennsylvania State University
  • Lea Santos, Yeshiva University
  • Luiz Santos, Perimeter Institute
  • Alessandro Silva, University of Trieste
  • Jonathan Torres-Herrera, Yeshiva University
  • Guifre Vidal, Perimeter Institute
  • Ronen Vosk, Weizmann Institute of Science

Details coming soon.

Matthew Fisher, University of California, Santa Barbara

Can Eigenstate Thermalization Breakdown without Disorder?

We describe a new diagnostic for many-body wavefunctions which generalizes the spatial bipartite entanglement entropy. By was of illustration, for a two-component wavefunction of heavy and light particles, a partial (projective) measurement of the coordinates of the heavy (but not light) particles is first performed, and then the entanglement entropy of the projected wavefunction for the light particles is computed. If the two-component wavefunction has a volume law entanglement entropy, yet the post measurement wavefunction of the light particles is disentangled with an area law entanglement, we refer to the original wavefunction as a “Quantum Disentangled State”. This diagnostic can be generalized to include other partial measurements, such as measuring the charge, but not spin, for finite-energy density eigenstates of Fermion Hubbard-type model. Quantum disentanglement results if the post measurement spin-wavefunction has an area law entanglement entropy. Recent numerics searching for such Quantum Disentangled States in 1d Hubbard-type models will be discussed in detail.
 
John Imbrie, Johns Hopkins University
 
A Rigorous Result on Many-Body Localization
 
I will discuss a proof of many-body localization for a one-dimensional spin chain with random local interactions. The proof depends on a physically reasonable assumption that limits the amount of level attraction in the system. I construct a sequence of local rotations that completely diagonalizes the Hamiltonian and exhibits the local degrees of freedom.
 
Marcos Rigol, Pennsylvania State University
 
Quantum Quenches in the Thermodynamic Limit
 
Studies of the quantum dynamics of isolated systems are currently providing fundamental insights into how statistical mechanics emerges under unitary time evolution. Thermalization seems ubiquitous, but experiments with ultracold gases have shown that it need not always occur, particularly near an integrable point. Unfortunately, computational studies of generic (nonintegrable) models are limited to small systems, for which arbitrarily long times can be calculated, or short times, for which large or infinite system sizes can be solved. Consequently, what happens in the thermodynamic limit after long times has been inaccessible to theoretical studies. In this talk, we introduce a linked-cluster based computational approach that allows one to address the latter question in lattice systems. We provide numerical evidence that, in the thermodynamic limit, thermalization occurs in the nonintegrable regime but fails at integrability. A phase transition-like behavior separates the two regimes.
 
Lea Santos, Yeshiva University
 
General Features of the Relaxation Dynamics of Isolated Interacting Quantum Systems
 
We consider isolated interacting quantum systems that are taken out of equilibrium instantaneously (quenched). We study numerically and analytically the probability of finding the initial state later on in time (the so-called fidelity or Loschmidt echo), the relaxation time of the system, and the evolution of few-body observables.  The fidelity decays fastest for systems described by full random matrices, where simultaneous many-body interactions are implied. In the realm of realistic systems with two-body interactions, the dynamics is slower and dependent on the energy of the initial state. The fastest fidelity decay in this case is Gaussian and can persist until saturation. The fidelity also plays a central role in the short-time dynamics of few-body observables that commute with the system Hamiltonian before the quench. Our analyses are mainly developed for initial states that can be prepared in experiments with cold atoms in optical lattices.

Keynote Speakers: Ground transportation arrangements will be made on your behalf and instructions sent prior to your arrival. If you need transportation while attending the conference, we offer suggestions below. If flying, we suggest that you book your flight to arrive at Toronto International Airport (YYZ) or the Region of Waterloo International Airport (YKF).


Boulevard Limousine (estimated travel time 1hr) The fare for Boulevard Limousine for one passenger is $118.00 to the Toronto Airport.  The fare for one passenger from the Toronto Airport to Waterloo is $133.00.  To make reservations, please visit their website or call 519-886-8090.


Airways Transit (estimated travel time 1hr) Airways Transit connects Toronto (Pearson), Hamilton (Munro), and Region of Waterloo International Airports with the Kitchener-Waterloo area by providing 24 hour shared ride door-to-door service. To make reservations please visit their website or call 519-886-2121.


0001 Toronto Cabs (estimated travel time 1hr)  Approximately $90.00 rate for one-way: Toronto International Airport to Waterloo. Call 416-809-5656. Waterloo Taxi (estimated travel time 1hr)  Fixed $76.50 rate for one-way: Waterloo to Toronto International Airport. Call 519-886-1200.  Note: One or more passengers can split this $90.00 flat rate.


Car Rentals Upon arrival in any of the terminals at Pearson International Airport there are a number of car rental agencies to choose from. Their booths are located on the arrivals level. The cost of a car rental is dependent upon the type of vehicle you would like and the length of the stay. Driving Directions 

  • From the airport, follow signs for Highway 427 South/Highway 401.  
  • Continue to follow signs for Highway 401 West - London.  
  • Proceed West on Highway 401.  
  • Exit Highway 401 at Highway 8 West.  
  • Take exit 278 (Highway 8 West) and follow 8 West for 5 km to Highway 85, towards Highway 7 East. 
  • Proceed on Highway 85 for 5 km to Bridgeport Road exit. Turn right at the off-ramp, traveling west.  
  • Follow Bridgeport Road for 2 km into downtown Waterloo.  
  • Bridgeport is a four-lane one-way road. It becomes Caroline Street at Albert Street. Continue straight ahead.  
  • Travel forward another 200 metres, but ease over into the right-hand lane. As you go down a hill and around a curve, look for the green Perimeter Institute sign on the right hand side. The parking lot entrance is just after the sign (past the historic grist mill that sits on the edge of Silver Lake).  
  • Turn right into the PI parking lot entrance.

 

*Keynote Speakers: Accommodation arrangements will be made on your behalf and instructions sent prior to your arrival. If you need accommodations while attending the conference, we offer suggestions for lodging below.


Waterloo Hotel 2 King Street North Waterloo, ON N2J 2W7 Phone: 519-885-2626 Distance from PI: 400 m


Waterloo Inn 475 King Street North Waterloo, ON N2J 2Z5 Reservation line: 1-800-361-4708 Reservation e-mail: reserve@waterlooinn.com Distance from PI: 3 km


Walper Terrace Hotel 1 King Street West Kitchener, ON N2G 1A1 Phone: 519-745-4321 Distance from PI: 4 km


Courtyard by Marriott 50 Benjamin Road East St. Jacobs, ON N2V 2J9 Phone: 519-884-9295 Distance from PI: 5.6 km

 

Scientific Organizers:

Dmitry Abanin, Perimeter Institute
Anushya Chandran, Perimeter Institute
Zlatko Papic, Perimeter Institute