Making Quantum Gravity Computable

Conference Date: 
Monday, June 19, 2017 (All day) to Friday, June 23, 2017 (All day)
Scientific Areas: 
Quantum Gravity

 

Quantum gravity research provides us with fascinating models for space-time at the smallest scales.  However, a bottleneck common to many approaches is the extraction of the large-scale dynamics for these models.  This will not only provide a crucial consistency test but also be essential for making sought-after predictions for future experiments.  Numeric tools will be inescapable for this task.  This school will therefore provide an introduction to these numerical tools and their applications to a broad array of quantum gravity approaches.  The school is aimed at junior researchers (PhD students/postdocs) with a quantum gravity background or interested in applying numerical tools to quantum gravity.

Topics covered include:

  • Introduction to Monte Carlo methods
  • Monte Carlo methods in Dynamical Triangulations
  • Introduction to Tensor Networks methods
  • Coarse graining of Spin Foams
  • Numerical tools in the Asymptotic Safety approach
  • Numerical tools for Loop Quantum Cosmology

Registration for this event is now closed.

Perimeter Institute has launched a new program whereby child care support may be available to facilitate your participation in workshops and conferences.  Please visit http://www.perimeterinstitute.ca/research/conferences/child-care-support-conference-participants for more information.

  • Benjamin Bahr, University of Hamburg
  • Gerard Barkema, Utrecht University
  • Timothy Budd, Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA 
  • Clement Delcamp, Perimeter Institute
  • Lisa Glaser, Radboud University Nijmegen
  • Masanori Hanada, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics
  • Frank Saueressig, Radboud University Nijmegen
  • Erik Schnetter, Perimeter Institute
  • Parampreet Singh, Louisiana State University
  • Sebastian Steinhaus, University of Hamburg
  • Sumati Surya, Raman Research Institute
  • Guifre Vidal, Perimeter Institute
  • Masooma Ali, University of New Brunswick
  • Fabio Anza, University of Oxford
  • Seth Kurankyi Asante, Perimeter Institute
  • Benjamin Bahr, University of Hamburg
  • Gerard Barkema, Utrecht University
  • Joren Brunekreef, Radboud University Nijmegen
  • Timothy Budd, Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA 
  • William Cunningham, Northeastern University
  • Mauro D'Arcangelo, University of Nottingham
  • Clement Delcamp, Perimeter Institute
  • Tobias Denz, Heidelberg University
  • Bianca Dittrich, Perimeter Institute
  • Zachary Fifer, University of Nottingham
  • Adam Getchell, University of California, Davis
  • Lisa Glaser, Radboud University Nijmegen
  • Christophe Goeller, École normale supérieure de Lyon
  • Masanori Hanada, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics
  • Syed Moeez Hassan, University of New Brunswick
  • Aaron Held, Heidelberg University
  • Florian Hopfmueller, Perimeter Institute
  • Stefan Janiszewski, University of Victoria
  • Nilas Klitgaard, Radboud University Nijmegen
  • Renate Loll, Radboud University Nijmegen
  • Phillip Mendonca, Florida Atlantic University
  • Jonah Miller, Perimeter Institute
  • Sebastian Mizera, Perimeter Institute
  • Seyed Faroogh Moosavian, Perimeter Institute
  • Prince Osei, Perimeter Institute
  • Abdulmajid Osumanu, University of Waterloo
  • Samuel Patrick, University of Nottingham
  • Andreas Pithis, Perimeter Institute
  • Giovanni Rabuffo, University of Hamburg
  • Manuel Reichert, Heidelberg University
  • Chris Ripken, Radboud University Nijmegen
  • Frank Saueressig, Radboud University Nijmegen
  • Erik Schnetter, Perimeter Institute
  • Barak Shoshany, Perimeter Institute
  • Parampreet Singh, Louisiana State University
  • Sebastian Steinhaus, University of Hamburg
  • Sumati Surya, Raman Research Institute
  • Fleur Versteegen, Heidelberg University
  • Guifre Vidal, Perimeter Institute
  • Francesca Vidotto, Radboud University Nijmegen
  • Ilya Vilensky, Florida Atlantic University
  • Steven Weinstein, University of Waterloo
  • Antonia Zipfel, Florida Atlantic University 

Monday, June 19, 2017

Time

Event

Location

8:00 – 8:40am

Registration

Reception

8:40 – 8:45am

Welcome and Opening Remarks

Bob Room

8:45 – 9:30am

Gerard Barkema, Utrecht University
Introduction to Monte Carlo methods - 1

Bob Room

9:45 – 10:30am

Gerard Barkema, Utrecht University
Introduction to Monte Carlo methods - 2

Bob Room

10:30 – 11:00am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st floor

11:00 – 11:45am

Guifre Vidal, Perimeter Institute
Introduction to Tensor Network methods - 1

Bob Room

12:00 – 12:45pm

Guifre Vidal, Perimeter Institute
Introduction to Tensor Network methods - 2

Bob Room

12:45 – 2:00pm

Lunch

Bistro – 2nd floor

2:00 – 3:15pm

Gerard Barkema, Utrecht University
Nilas Klitgaard, Radboud University Nijmegen
Tutorial: Introduction to Monte Carlo Methods

Bob Room

3:15 – 3:45pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st floor

3:45 – 5:00pm

Guifre Vidal, Perimeter Institute
Clement Delcamp, Perimeter Institute
Tutorial: Introcution to Tensor Network methods

Bob Room

5:15 – 6:15pm

Erik Schnetter, Perimeter Institute
Scientific Computing and Computational Science

Bob Room

 

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Time

Event

Location

8:45 – 9:30am

Gerard Barkema, Utrecht University
Introduction to Monte Carlo methods - 3

Bob Room

9:45 – 10:30am

Gerard Barkema, Utrecht University
Introduction to Monte Carlo methods - 4

Bob Room

10:30 – 11:00am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st floor

11:00 – 11:45am

Guifre Vidal, Perimeter Institute
Introduction to Tensor Network methods - 3

Bob Room

12:00 – 12:45pm

Guifre Vidal, Perimeter Institute
Introduction to Tensor Network methods - 4

Bob Room

12:45 – 2:00pm

Lunch

Bistro – 2nd floor

2:00 – 3:15pm

Gerard Barkema, Utrecht University
Nilas Klitgaard, Radboud University Nijmegen
Tutorial: Introduction to Monte Carlo methods

Bob Room

3:15 – 3:45pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st floor

3:45 – 5:00pm

Guifre Vidal, Perimeter Institute
Clement Delcamp, Perimeter Institute
Tutorial: Introduction to Tensor Network methods

Bob Room

5:15 – 6:15pm

Lisa Glaser, Radboud University Nijmegen
Random and Fuzzy

Bob Room

6:15 – 6:45

Chris Ripken, Radboud University Nijmegen
*Poster Session

Bob Room

6:15pm

BBQ

Bistro – 1st floor

 

* Actual posters will be set up in the Atrium, however 1 minute presentation will take place in the Bob room.

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Time

Event

Location

8:45 – 9:30am

Timothy Budd, Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA
Monte Carlo methods in Dynamical Triangulations - 1

Bob Room

9:45 – 10:30am

Timothy Budd, Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA
Monte Carlo methods in Dynamical Triangulations - 2

Bob Room

10:30 – 11:00am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st floor

11:00 – 11:45am

Benjamin Bahr, University of Hamburg
Bianca Dittrich, Perimeter Institute
Coarse-graining of Spin Foams -1

Bob Room

12:00 – 12:45pm

Benjamin Bahr, University of Hamburg
Bianca Dittrich, Perimeter Institute
Coarse-graining of Spin Foams - 2

Bob Room

12:45 – 2:00pm

Lunch

Bistro – 2nd floor

2:00 – 3:15pm

Timothy Budd, Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA
Joren Brunekreef, Radboud University Nijmegen
Tutorial: Monte Carlo methods in Dynamical Triangulations

Bob Room

3:15 – 3:45pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st floor

3:45 – 5:00pm

Benjamin Bahr, University of Hamburg
Bianca Dittrich, Perimeter Institute
Sebastian Steinhaus, University of Hamburg
Tutorial: Coarse-graining of Spin Foams

Bob Room

5:15 – 6:15pm

Sumati Surya, Raman Research Institute
Numerical Questions in Causal Set Quantum Gravity

Bob Room

 

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Time

Event

Location

8:45 – 9:30am

Timothy Budd, Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA
Monte Carlo methods in Dynamical Triangulations - 3

Bob Room

9:45 – 10:30am

Timothy Budd, Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA
Monte Carlo methods in Dynamical Triangulations - 4

Bob Room

10:30 – 11:00am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st floor

11:00 – 11:45am

Benjamin Bahr, University of Hamburg
Bianca Dittrich, Perimeter Institute
Coarse-graining of Spin Foams - 3

Bob Room

12:00 – 12:45pm

Benjamin Bahr, University of Hamburg
Bianca Dittrich, Perimeter Institute
Coarse-graining of Spin Foams - 4

Bob Room

12:45 – 2:00pm

Lunch

Bistro – 2nd floor

2:00 – 3:15pm

Timothy Budd, Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA
Joren Brunekreef, Radboud University Nijmegen
Tutorial: Monte Carlo methods in Dynamical Triangulations

Bob Room

3:15 – 3:45pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st floor

3:45 – 5:00pm

Benjamin Bahr, University of Hamburg
Bianca Dittrich, Perimeter Institute
Sebastian Steinhaus, University of Hamburg
Tutorial: Coarse-graining of Spin Foams

Bob Room

5:15 – 6:15pm

Masanori Hanada, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics
Quantum Gravity from Lattice Gauge Theory via Holography

Bob Room

 

Friday, June 23, 2017

Time

Event

Location

8:45 – 9:30am

Parampreet Singh, Louisiana State University
Numerical loop quantum cosmology

Bob Room

9:45 – 10:30am

Parampreet Singh, Louisiana State University
Numerical loop quantum cosmology 

Bob Room

10:30 – 11:00am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st floor

11:00 – 11:45am

Frank Saueressig, Radboud University Nijmegen
The Universal Renormalization Group Machine - 1

Bob Room

12:00 – 12:45pm

Frank Saueressig, Radboud University Nijmegen
The Universal Renormalization Group Machine - 2

Bob Room

12:45 – 2:00pm

Lunch

Bistro – 2nd floor

2:00 – 3:15pm

Free

Bob Room

3:15 – 3:45pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st floor

3:45 – 5:00pm

Free

Bob Room

5:15 – 6:15pm

Free

Bob Room

 

 

 

 

Friday Jun 23, 2017
Speaker(s): 

Functional renormalization group techniques based on Wetterichs equation provide a powerful tool for studying the properties of gravity in the quantum regime and its connection to the observable low-energy world. Explicit computations in this framework require the evaluation of functional traces over operator-valued functions. In these lectures I will give a pedagogical introduction to the Universal Renormalization Group Machine, a combinatorial algorithm which allows evaluating such traces in a systematic way.

Scientific Areas: 

 

Friday Jun 23, 2017
Speaker(s): 

Functional renormalization group techniques based on Wetterichs equation provide a powerful tool for studying the properties of gravity in the quantum regime and its connection to the observable low-energy world. Explicit computations in this framework require the evaluation of functional traces over operator-valued functions. In these lectures I will give a pedagogical introduction to the Universal Renormalization Group Machine, a combinatorial algorithm which allows evaluating such traces in a systematic way.

Scientific Areas: 

 

Friday Jun 23, 2017
Speaker(s): 

In the last decade various cosmological spacetimes have been quantized using the techniques of loop quantum gravity. To understand singularity resolution and decipher reliable Planck scale physics, development of new numerical methods and usage of high performance computing is critical in loop quantum cosmology. In recent years, these developments have robustly demonstrated resolution of singularities in quantum spacetimes.

Scientific Areas: 

 

Friday Jun 23, 2017
Speaker(s): 

In the last decade various cosmological spacetimes have been quantized using the techniques of loop quantum gravity. To understand singularity resolution and decipher reliable Planck scale physics, development of new numerical methods and usage of high performance computing is critical in loop quantum cosmology. In recent years, these developments have robustly demonstrated resolution of singularities in quantum spacetimes.

Scientific Areas: 

 

Thursday Jun 22, 2017
Speaker(s): 

The gauge/gravity duality relates supersymmetric gauge theories to superstring/M-theory.
Powerful Monte Carlo methods developed in lattice QCD can be applied to study the former,and from the simulation data we can extract the quantum gravitational effects. In this talk I will give a brief introduction to lattice gauge theory and supersymmetry on a lattice, and show some applications to quantum gravity via the gauge/gravity duality.

Scientific Areas: 

 

 

 

Pages

Scientific Organizers:

  • Bianca Dittrich, Perimeter Institute
  • Renate Loll, Radboud University Nijmegan